The Death of Aase 2/28

A late post this time, but it couldn’t be avoided. There’s been much to celebrate with the publishing of my book, Cultured Grugs–a collection of posts from this site, my American Sun articles, and some new material written for the book–as well as visitations from friends and family. You’d think they were excited about the upcoming birth of a baby or something.

Life has been good lately and God has been rather good to me. Our age of precarity puts the fear of the other foot pressing down in you but despite it one must stop and appreciate what is good. My mind has been focused on the good life and what it means to live one since I’ll have far too much to teach the next generation.

Peer Gynt

The music for this week’s post is Peer Gynt, specifically “The Death of Aase“. Most people will be familiar with a separate piece from this suite, “In The Hall of the Mountain King”, though they most likely don’t know the origins. Peer Gynt is both a musical suite and a play, Edvard Grieg writing the music for the play by Henrik Ibsen. The work is rooted in the fairy tales of Norway and Ibsen production with its accompanying incidental music among the most popular cultural works that Norway has produced.

There is a Faustian quality to the story but it retains its very Scandinavian character. After living a brigand’s life in the hills, Peer Gynt comes down to the mountains to be there as his mother Aase dies. He said he had something heavy to fetch. Children burying their parents is a certainty for most. What comes next is the mystery, something many never solve. Peer travels to North Africa in order to find himself. He never does, he’s lived his life as a troll. He believe himself lost. There is resonance here, as the soul of the northerner is always on the move but there is the fear he’ll never find himself. What we have traveled for our whole lives if we are nothing? The ending is ambiguous. For Peer Gynt, and for us. The heaviest notes however remain with the deaths of our mothers.

“Peer, we shall meet at the last crossroads, and then we shall see if… I’ll say no more.”

Some Kind of Heaven

We watched Some Kind of Heaven, the documentary about the artificially constructed Baby Boomer retirement community in Florida that is population to over one hundred thousand. It might have been a mistake. I don’t know how to describe it as other than a docudrama sequel of Christopher Lasch’s The Culture of Narcissism with Jean Baudrillard as consultant. That might not make sense, but it’s weird to peer into this artificial bubble and watch these sad stories play out. It left me with a weird feeling I didn’t like as I’m allergic to the kind of “gawking at white people” entertainment that’s peddled by Jews, white liberals, and the vegetable medley of mediocre strivers.

I can’t really recommend it. For a documentary it’s got some beautiful cinematography and it’s nice getting an inside look into The Villages, but there’s just this miasma of sadness that settles over you while you watch it. We were bothered a lot after watching it. I can’t think of any other time in history when a people just retired to completely different part of the country en masse, especially one artificially constructed for that purpose with its own fake history. Seeing the Villages on the inside is like watching a pristine train set being run in a dusty attic in a house with no children.

Our parents often know more than they let on. I’ve had enough conversations with older relatives to know this is just a simple fact. The frustration that many in my generation feel is in some large part the result of the massive alienation we feel at not having any sense of country that our parents were able to take for granted and not really understanding the kind of cultural conditioning they underwent which was different from ours, but they do on some level understand. It’s an incomplete understanding though, and that may only frustrate people more.

Some of this results from simply how both radical and extremist my generation and the next are, whereas the Baby Boomers, for all of their propensity to say very actionable things, have a sense of security and stability they can recall and wish to go back to. When we watched Some Kind of Heaven, I was struck by how the design for The Villages was based on ‘the town squares we all grew up in’, or however exactly one of the people in the documentary explained it. That’s not a cultural memory that I can draw upon and I know that’s true for millions of my generational cohorts. It might go a long way towards explaining Josh Neal’s thesis in American Extremist about the different between radicals and extremists.

There were many parents who didn’t try, I know. There were many who did though, and if we had tried like them we would have failed too. We might have done worse, probably.

Collapse

Bad news continues to trickle out of the states that were badly affected by the ravaging snowstorm that blew through a couple of weeks ago. In Texas you have thousands of people at risk as they can’t get water for their dialysis, in Arkansas they’re crapping in bags, and in Tennessee they’re sending water tankers to hospitals. It’s become a real spotlight on America’s infrastructure and the nation’s precarious relationship with its water. It reminds me as well that Michael Burry, the first man to foresee the mortgage crisis and bet against it moved onto water futures after that.

Collapse is always a difficult thing to talk about. All processes are difficult to talk about. There’s a certain simplicity people would like to have, and that’s understandable. Is the patient healthy or sick? Just break it down for me, doc, I don’t need the details on how the complexity of his nervous system works. Collapse works the same way and unfortunately this leads to both misunderstanding and a kind of binary thinking where people will believe that decline and collapse are so intrinsically different that you cannot call America a place in a state of collapse unless you have Lord Humungus from Mad Max 2 scouring a scorched wasteland and rummaging for catamites. Or they may believe that because the elites are perfectly fine and running their system then that’s indicative of its total health and ability to keep running. The irony that people in what is supposedly the greatest nation on earth are arguing what collapse means like angels on the head of a pin while cities are without water thanks to a bad snowstorm seems lost on some.

Excuses can and will be made that there’s nothing you can really do about catastrophic weather, it’s always wrecked countries and required places to rebuild and recover. The Devil’s advocate would say “was the San Francisco earthquake at the turn of the 20th century indicative that the United States was in a state of collapse?” It’s a fair question, which is why to understand the process one has to look at how the response is managed. Empires don’t die because they failed to prevent catastrophe, they die because they failed to manage catastrophe. The Roman Empire could have fallen in the third century, it was teetering on the brink, but the reforms of Diocletian restored stability and gave the empire a new life to continue. This crisis prefigured Constantine the Great, showing that proper responses to catastrophe does not give any empire a certain fatalist inevitability, that it will still be able to produce great men down the line.

Does America have that capability? I think if you were to present this as it is to people, they’d be hard pressed to say yes, or if they do would struggle to explain how. “Well, they’ll just think of something” is a common refrain. Maybe they will. Is that what you’re planning to bank on though? To paraphrase my father however, you can crap in one bag or hope in the other and see which one fills faster. From what I’ve seen people are beginning to give up on hope and are beginning to invest more in emergency kits and supplies. The worst it can do is take up some space.

Excerpt from Cultured Grugs

I’ll end this week’s post with an excerpt from now my available books, Cultured Grugs:

Finally, this society is intolerable. There is no other way to get around it. There is no other way to explain it. It is full of deceit and it is full of predators. It is full of malevolent sadists and it is full of people with no courage. It is disgusting on so many levels, and you’re absolutely right to reject it. And you will absolutely be punished for that. You will need to be careful over what you say and who you trust as this society has no honor and no sense of justice. It is ruled by hostile, evil people who hate and despise the normal people who live in it. People like your mother and I. People like you.

Now you know it. So what do you do now?

Some might say this is a horrible thing to be telling a child, but regardless of when you read this, if you’re old enough to understand the words that I’m saying, you’ll be old enough to understand how important they are. And you’ll be old enough to understand that we filled our home with love because the world is full of heartlessness. We filled your life with nature and art because there are many fine things worth fighting for, virtue most of all.

Fantasia on a Theme (Sunday 2/21)

It’s been some time since we’ve had some content here. I can’t promise that I’ll be able to commit to making this the weekly post that I would like it to be as there’s always a thousand good reasons to be doing anything else, but some things do need to be done simply because they must be done. Five hundred to a thousand words is the least I can do to give you something to mull over breakfast.

Music of the Week: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis by Vaughan Williams

I’m generally tone-deaf, if not possibly literally, so the music to accompany this post comes via my classically trained missus. She calls this exquisite, and with her synesthesia she sees big green fields and endless meadows. “Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis” was inspired by the 16th century English choral musician Thomas Tallis’ “Third Mode Melody” from his nine psalm chant tunes. The largely 20th century English composer Vaughan Williams broke with many of the musical conventions of the time with composing music that was largely inspired by the Renaissance, Tudor, and folk music compositions of England. He was, in a sense, a true English patriot in his music. Feel your heart achingly swell with visions of a land gone by as the work rolls towards its beautiful crescendo.

We think you will enjoy.

Some Kind of Heaven

There’s a new documentary out by Lance Oppenheim called Some Kind of Heaven, supposedly in an inside scoop slash insane narrative about the Baby Boomer retirement haven in Florida known as The Villages. The Daily Mail wrote a rather lengthy description of what is depicted within the documentary on this place. It’s very anxiety-inducing, a fake wonderland where the most benign expressions of a shattered culture begin to play out in what is essentially an adult amusement park. It’s described as a ‘utopian Disneyland with a seedy underbelly’ and calls to mind what Jean Baudrillard writes on Disneyland in Simulacra and Simulation:

“The Disneyland imaginary is neither true nor false: it is a deterrence machine set up in order to rejuvenate in reverse the fiction of the real…It’s meant to be an infantile world, in order to make us believe that the adults are elsewhere, in the “real” world, and to conceal the fact that real childishness is everywhere, particularly among those adults who go there to act the child in order to foster illusions of their real childishness.”

From the description in the Daily Mail article, one might call The Villages the fulfillment of this. I’m generally hesitant about engaging in generational bashing. Christopher Lasch already wrote the best description of the generation in The Culture of Narcissism and he greatly saw them as a product of what the System had created. If one wanted to trace the chain of blame back you could go back to the Greatest Generation that raised, and probably further back than that. Trying to understand it is of little use though, as we are the same product just down the chain. All we can do is really understand the circumstances, poke a little fun, and try to pick up the pieces. I’m also hesitant to indulge in something like this given the last name of the director and the involvement of Darren Aronofsky. You can’t make fun of our Boomers; only we can do that.

I may watch it tonight, regardless.

Cultural disintegration is worth exploring but it’s extremely difficult to grasp your hands around as it quickly just becomes pointing and gawking at this continental mess. It’s easy to fall into resentment and rage. It’s easy to be mad at another generation. If the Boomers disappeared overnight, which on some level they one day will, the problems we have will largely be the same. If the Boomers had never existed, our problems would probably still be the same, albeit in different forms. The situation and the mountainous climb, almost Sisyphean, that will need to be done by those unhappy is to forge generational connections that endure and safeguard that wealth and capital in all forms that are being vacuumed up by pederast grifters and shapeshifting psychopaths.

The future requires families, intact as they can be. It requires people who can let righteous resentment for the smallest of things become better fury at the biggest of crimes. There is value in virtue in a nihilistic age, even if it doesn’t seem like it.

That’s all for this week. In the future I’d like to add more structure and more topics to these posts but this was done very late in the morning on the shortest notice. Church bells are ringing and the choir is calling. Sound and fury, fury and sound.

Keep an eye on Antelope Hill as they’ll soon be releasing my collection of old and new writings, Cultured Grugs.

Does She Love You?

The world ought not to be a harmonious loving place. It ought to be a place of fierce discord and intermittent harmonies: which it is. Love ought not to be perfect. It ought to have perfect moments, and wildernesses of thorn bushes. Which it has. A “perfect” relationship ought not to be possible. Every relationship should have its absolute limits, its absolute reserves, essential to the singleness of the soul in each person. A truly perfect relationship is one in which each party leaves great tracts unknown in the other party.” – D.H. Lawrence, “Studies in Classic American Literature”

Men with mystic mindsets are a superstitious sort, especially when it comes to women. As they well should. Had we a little more scrutiny toward Eve in Eden or a little more responsibility to God after, we might still be in the garden naming wondrous beasts. We fear that power however, as to name it is to claim it. McCarthy says the same in Outer Dark, for to name is it to claim it and if you don’t name it then “you cain’t talk about it even.” Modern men, being gnostics of another notion, can’t even name their own own relationships with women, and thus cannot claim them.

Continue reading “Does She Love You?”

Goodbye To All That

America has never been an easy place to love. For many of us that relationship has been rife with co-dependencies because when you feel there is no there there, you quickly learn that for you there is no anywhere. You cling to it like a feral child that can’t bear to leave his mother’s dessicated corpse because there never was any life outside of her even after you were born. Life in the most diverse nation on earth is simply a force majeure. Identify with the hurricane if you can, though you may not like what the whirlwind has to say.

Continue reading “Goodbye To All That”

The Last Testament of Pentti Linkola

Pentti Linkola passed away in his sleep on April 5th, 2020. I don’t have much to say about the passing of Linkola. What I believe I have said in my piece on Pentti Linkola at American Sun. One of my Finnish translators, Fatidicus Aeternus, brought two articles about Linkola to my attention that are likely the last public comments Linkola made and helpfully translated them for me.

Continue reading “The Last Testament of Pentti Linkola”

Pentti Linkola: A Finnish Scapegoat

This article is a sourced translation of this Finnish-language post on Pentti Linkola. I received two separate translations on it and merged the two together with my own attempt to explain and clarify Finnish references. Thank you to both Fatidicus Aeternus and Rand for their work in translating this, Alarik for his additional translation suggestions, and to the original author TIMO HÄNNIKÄINEN.

Nowadays in Finland, Pentti Linkola has become a national public property. He still raises conflicting reactions to be sure: for some he is a prophetic visionary or an incorruptible truth-teller, to others he is a nutcase or an attention seeking ecofascist. But everyone knows who he is and carry with them various anecdotes about his life. Interviews with Linkola are published on visible mediums yearly, despite him saying things which would get anyone else sued or socially ostracized.

Continue reading “Pentti Linkola: A Finnish Scapegoat”

Fear and Self-Loathing in America

the following is a sample from my forthcoming American Sun article on the history and uses of humiliation.

“What did the Pilgrim Fathers come for, then, when they came so gruesomely over the black sea? Oh, it was in a black spirit. A black revulsion from Europe, from the old authority of Europe, from kings and bishops and popes. And more. When you look into it, more. They were black, masterful men, they wanted something else. No kings, no bishops maybe. Even no God Almighty. But also, no more of this new ‘humanity’ which followed the Renaissance. None of this new liberty which was to be so pretty in Europe. Something grimmer, by no means free-and-easy.” – DH Lawrence, “Studies in Classic American Literature”

Harvard was established to train Puritan clergy and it never stopped.

Humiliations runs deep in the American soul. America is not a land that one thinks of when they think of cultural cringe or the self-loathing that other nations, especially Anglo, have been all too eager to revel in. The Puritans occupy the American imagination, as they should for that American soul cannot be understood without understanding the Puritans, one of history’s great purity spiralers. Never has the purity spiral ascended so high and fallen so low than in their history.

Continue reading “Fear and Self-Loathing in America”